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pass both chambers of congress. >> a rare senate appearance, by former majority leader bob dole wasn't enough to win over republican support for a treaty promising equal rights for people with disabilities. we'll talk with the leading sponsor john kerry about what he called one of the sadsest days of his long senate career. >> this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. >> at nato today, secretary of state hillary clinton bids farewell and voices a warning about securing syria's chemical weapons. >> our concerns that an increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or might lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> and road to 2016, congressman paul ryan and senator marco rubio drop big hints at last night's dinner honoring jack kemp. >> you know any good diners in new hampshire or iowa, right? >> paul, thank you for your invitation for lunch in iowa and new hampshire, but i will not stand by and watch the people of so
." andrea, chime in here. despite a dramatic appearance from 89-year-old former senator bob dole, the senate failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wou
backlash in 2014 was very apparent in the senate. advocate for the disabled, a war hero, bob dole seated on the senate floor, did not stop republicans from voting down a united nations treaty that would promote equal rights and better treatment for the disabled around the world which says is inspired by the americans with disabilities act. noefrdz i in other words by a u.s. law. >> it's unthinkable that americans could not get over a curb or enter a school building or watch a debate if they were in a wheelchair. >> that's why a veteran comes back to the senate on an early december day because it matters. >> despite those pleas from two former presidential nominees, just eight republican senators voted to ratify the treaty sending it down in defeat. every senator up for re-election in 2014 except susan collins who, by the way, is from a blue state, voted against it. lindsey graham cast a no vote though john mccain was one of the treaty's biggest advocates. kelly ayotte voted for it. mississippi senator thad cochrane voted in favor and then as it was going down switched his vote to no. coc
foley and george mitchell, bob michaels, and bob dole. there is no question none of this could have happened without them coming to the table and understanding how important it was to achieve a result. i also have to emphasize what i believe is the fundamental catalyst for all of this. that is there was a president who was determined to solve this issue. absolutely determined. as we see, not only was he willing, but he ended up sacrificing tremendous political capital, personal political capital in order to do what he felt the country needed at that time. there are a lot of folks who like these kinds of agreements to take place in a climate where there are no politics. it will never happen. it will never happen because politics is the cement that holds the system together, not what divides it. in my opinion, there are three political aspects that have to be looked at in what happened in 1990 and certainly have parallels to what is going on today. there are the politics of the differences in philosophy. there certainly is a liberal perspective, generally attributed to the democratic
other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit
an incredible job. chris, i would say, we are with two senators now, and i am always reminded of when bob dole in 1968 left the house to go to the senate, he said in that single act he enraged the intelligence of both bodies. bob corker is from the state that i think has produced more interesting and important politicians over the last 40 years than any other in america, even though it is a relatively small state. howard baker and al gore and now bob corker -- it really is an incredible testament to your state. it probably goes back to the tensions during the civil war -- east and west and all that. >> probably does. >> and mark warner, probably more than anyone, tom davis is encyclopedic on everything political, but mark warner probably more than any single figure has taken his state of virginia from a fairly reliable red states to a state that i would call almost a slight bluish purple. he left the governor's office seven years ago. he has been out of state government for seven years. he is the most popular figure in the state of virginia, and has been throughout that entire time. not only h
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6